Tag Archives: Judgement at Nuremberg

Tracy & Hepburn

Dear Friends,
As we have mentioned before, Katharine Hepburn played a huge role in helping us bring our film, Judgement at Nuremberg, to the big screen (for that story click on this link) by bringing the script to Spencer Tracy.

At that point, early 1960s, Hepburn and Tracy had starred in eight movies together, with one final movie in 1967. Last night on Turner Classic Movies, we watched their film, Desk Set, and we just loved it so! We decided that we wanted to share with you a list of their movies for you to enjoy as well:

Woman of The Year (1942) Hepburn and Tracy play married reporters working for the same newspaper, where Hepburn’s character gets all the accolades.

Keeper of the Flame (1943) Tracy plays a reporter covering the sudden death of a beloved war hero, whose widow is played by Hepburn.

Without Love (1945) Tracy plays a scientist in need of a place to work and Hepburn a single woman with a conveniently unused house with a science lab in the basement.

Sea of Grass (1947) Hepburn plays a St. Louis woman wooed by a New Mexican rancher (Tracy), only to discover when she arrives in New Mexico he’s not as charming and debonair as she thought.

State of the Union (1948) is a political drama where Tracy plays a Presidential Candidate and Hepburn his estranged wife, who is skeptical, but campaigns for him on the road to the White House.

Adam’s Rib (1949) based on a true story, Hepburn and Tracy play a married prosecutor and defense lawyer pitted against each other in a murder trial where Hepburn defends a woman accused of shooting her husband.

Pat and Mike (1952) Hepburn plays a brilliant athlete with a domineering fiancé and Tracy her slightly unscrupulous manager, who helps her escape from the clutches of her fiancé.

Desk Set (1957) Hepburn plays Department Head of Research for a big television company and Tracy the man sent in to computerize the entire department.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967) in their final movie, Hepburn and Tracy play a married couple whose daughter introduces them to her new boyfriend (played by Sidney Poitier).

They were so magical on the screen together! All of these films are worth watching—and if you’d like to own the whole collection, Amazon has a set for sale which you can access by clicking here or the picture below.

tracy and hepburn

We hope you enjoy!
Best,
Philip & Marilyn

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More About Marlene…

I TALKED A LOT WITH MARLENE DIETRICH

marlene dietrich 2

We recently wrote about Marlene Dietrich’s 1930 film, Blue Angel, which we urged you to see. So interesting!

And today I’m telling you about Marlene, whom I got to know quite well during the filming of JUDGEMENT AT NUREMBERG, a manuscript I found and became one of its film producers.

During the course of the 12 weeks shooting of the film in Hollywood I spent every morning with Marlene in her dressing room talking and wiling/ away the hours waiting for her to be called.

And this is what is so surprising: Marlene’s thinking was totally antithetical to her glamorous image.

If you watch Blue Angel, you will see the real Marlene. She wanted no part of glamour. You see her as a down to earth regular woman, spending no time on makeup, dresses, and other fashion activities. I would say she wanted to be respected for her thoughts and actions.

So…when she was chosen out of hundreds of actresses to go to Hollywood and star in Morocco with Gary Cooper (1930), she had no idea she would turn into one of the two most glamorous stars ever seen on screen – the other being Greta Garbo.

It’s so ironic that the most sexy and gorgeous star was totally against her image. As we spent many mornings in her dressing room she wanted to talk about regular things, average happenings in the newspaper, or, indeed, the difficulties of the human race.

She was very interested in helping the poor, and spent much time writing letters and working to help people she knew, or who wrote to her about their problems

If aspects of her film persona came up, she would ridicule her costume requirements. And yet she was a total expert. She chose or created every aspect of her inimitable attire. She created Marlene Dietrich, The Glamor Queen of All Time.

Marlene Dietrich was a wonderful, lovely, caring person, and a great actress, but never wanting to be what the Hollywood image makers had decried for her.

Philip Langner

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