Tag Archives: movies

Show Boat

Dear Friends,

The other night we saw one of our favorite musicals on television: Showboat.

show boat 1951

This film was produced in 1951, starring Kathryn Grayson, Ava Gardner, and Howard Keel and directed by George Sidney. It was based on the original Broadway musical written by Oscar Hammerstein II with music by Jerome Kern. It tells the story of late 19th century hijinks aboard a Mississippi River show boat. It features some of Broadway’s greatest show tunes including Ol’ Man River, Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man, and Make Believe.

This musical is so superb that it makes us want to discuss the importance of theatre in our lives. We seldom think about it, but what if, at 5:30pm every night after a day of work, we simply had dinner and went to bed? Our workdays are usually not very spiritual or uplifting, so it is at nighttime and weekends that we get to observe and participate in the “finer things in life,” as in “what are we living for?” So this film says it all!

It’s wonderful and we’re so glad to have seen it on television! If you want to see it, it is available to watch via streaming or to purchase on Amazon (click here )

Best wishes,
Philip & Marilyn Langner

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Tracy & Hepburn

Dear Friends,
As we have mentioned before, Katharine Hepburn played a huge role in helping us bring our film, Judgement at Nuremberg, to the big screen (for that story click on this link) by bringing the script to Spencer Tracy.

At that point, early 1960s, Hepburn and Tracy had starred in eight movies together, with one final movie in 1967. Last night on Turner Classic Movies, we watched their film, Desk Set, and we just loved it so! We decided that we wanted to share with you a list of their movies for you to enjoy as well:

Woman of The Year (1942) Hepburn and Tracy play married reporters working for the same newspaper, where Hepburn’s character gets all the accolades.

Keeper of the Flame (1943) Tracy plays a reporter covering the sudden death of a beloved war hero, whose widow is played by Hepburn.

Without Love (1945) Tracy plays a scientist in need of a place to work and Hepburn a single woman with a conveniently unused house with a science lab in the basement.

Sea of Grass (1947) Hepburn plays a St. Louis woman wooed by a New Mexican rancher (Tracy), only to discover when she arrives in New Mexico he’s not as charming and debonair as she thought.

State of the Union (1948) is a political drama where Tracy plays a Presidential Candidate and Hepburn his estranged wife, who is skeptical, but campaigns for him on the road to the White House.

Adam’s Rib (1949) based on a true story, Hepburn and Tracy play a married prosecutor and defense lawyer pitted against each other in a murder trial where Hepburn defends a woman accused of shooting her husband.

Pat and Mike (1952) Hepburn plays a brilliant athlete with a domineering fiancé and Tracy her slightly unscrupulous manager, who helps her escape from the clutches of her fiancé.

Desk Set (1957) Hepburn plays Department Head of Research for a big television company and Tracy the man sent in to computerize the entire department.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967) in their final movie, Hepburn and Tracy play a married couple whose daughter introduces them to her new boyfriend (played by Sidney Poitier).

They were so magical on the screen together! All of these films are worth watching—and if you’d like to own the whole collection, Amazon has a set for sale which you can access by clicking here or the picture below.

tracy and hepburn

We hope you enjoy!
Best,
Philip & Marilyn

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The Gish Sisters

Dear Friends,

Last week we told you about all the wonderful movies we’ve been watching this summer and we wanted to add one more to the list: Orphans of the Storm, starring Lillian Gish and Dorothy Gish.

This nearly 100-year-old silent movie is the story of two orphaned sisters during the French revolution. Despite the 3-hour length, we stayed glued to the screen—a testament to writer/producer/director DW Griffith, the Gish sisters, and their supporting cast. We knew the Gish sisters so well–they were friends of our parents and performed in many plays for The Theatre Guild!

orphans of the storm

It is unbelievable how far cinema has advanced, but equally as amazing how much we can still enjoy the classics by tuning into Turner Classic Movies!

Best,
Philip & Marilyn

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Summer Nights

Dear Friends,

Today we are sending you information to while away your summer.
Every night we turn the television channel to Turner Classic Movies, and each night there is always a wonderful old movie to watch.

So far this summer we have watched over 60 movies, including the wonderful classics such as:

It Happened One Night
Three Coins in the Fountain
Jezebel
Holiday Inn
A Room With a View
Some Like It Hot
Laura
Two For The Road
The Blue Angel
Funny Face
The Dirty Dozen
Follow The Fleet
Cabaret
Chorus Line
The Scarlet Pimpernel
All The King’s Men
For Me and My Gal
Gaslight

And such great stars as:
Clark Gable, Bette Davis, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Boyer, Marlene Dietrich, Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, John Cassavetes, Marilyn Monroe, Fred Astaire, Eva Gabor, Tyrone Power, and Ian McKellen—to name a few!

In this day and age where nothing good seems to be on (and almost never any good news), it’s always nice to know that you can find a great classic movie right on your television set to pass the evening!

Best,
Philip & Marilyn

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All The Money

Dear Friends,

We were reading a review yesterday in the New York Times about our dear friend, Christopher Plummer.

He has a new movie, All The Money in The World, and it is just fantastic!

According to Manohla Dargis’s review in the New York Times:

Mr. Plummer can be an aloof, fairly cool screen presence and he chills Getty Sr. with cruel glints, funereal insinuation and a controlled, withholding physicality. A lot of actors soften their heavies, as if nervously asserting their own humanity. With Mr. Scott, Mr. Plummer instead creates a rapacious man whose hunger for wealth and power (and more money, always more) has hollowed him out and whose fatherly touch, at its most consuming, brings to mind Goya’s painting of Saturn eating his son. The horror of Getty Sr. is that he is never less than human, but that he’s hoarded everything, including every last vestige of love, for himself. It’s a magnificent portrait of self-annihilation.

Of course, we aren’t surprised by this—we have known Chris for a very long time and we’ve seen him in many memorable performances.
Chris Plummer
All The Money in The World is showing at a movie theater near you.

Best regards,
Philip and Marilyn

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Classic Movies on the Small Screen

Dear Friends,

Today we want to write to you about a lovely happening brought to us by our daughter.

I am speaking about the films that are available every day on Turner Classic Movies (here in New York, it’s Channel 82).

We have been going about our business for years, only really watching PBS and a handful of news stations, but we never seem to branch out and explore other channels.  Finally, our daughter “made us” turn to Channel 82 and we have been extremely enthusiastic ever since!

TCM actors

The best thing about TCM is that they play movies you’d never get to see normally and when you watch them, you realize that you are getting to watch the best movies that were made between 1930-1950!

Many of these films are absolutely wonderful!  In analyzing them, we find that they are very much like Broadway plays.  Back then, movies had not gone into space or battled aliens or imaginary characters—they simply had the feel of the stage, however, you were just viewing them on the big (and now small) screen!

It is so interesting to watch great stars like Bette Davis or Joan Crawford just by changing the channel.  We love this era of movies, where everyone spoke so passionately about life!

The next time you find yourself in front of the television, do turn it on to Turner Classic Movies—you never know what you’re going to find! For example, last night’s line-up was The Good Earth (1933), a wonderful film adaptation of the novel by Pearl S. Buck.  That was followed by the entertaining musical Gold Diggers (1933) starring Ruby Keeler and Dick Powell.  After that was a favorite of ours, Holiday, starring Carey Grant and Katharine Hepburn.  All around, it was an entertaining evening!

Best regards,

Philip & Marilyn

PS—speaking of Bette and Joan, the FX series Feuds: Bette and Joan, starring Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon, only has only weeks left—don’t miss out!  Sundays at 10pm (Eastern Standard Time) on the FX channel.

feud poster

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La La Land

Dear Friends,

We have just seen the movie La La Land and it is a once-in-10-years kind of movie!

The two actors—Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling—are incredible and have delivered the movie of the year (or perhaps 10 years?).    La La Land won 7 Golden Globes, including Best Motion Picture—Comedy or Musical and Best Performance by Actor in a Motion Picture—Comedy or Musical (Gosling) and Best Performance by Actress in a Motion Picture—Comedy or Musical (Stone).

la-la-land-2

It is still showing in movie theaters.  Click on the picture for the full review from Peter Travers in Rolling Stone.

Best regards,

Philip & Marilyn Langner

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We Still Give A Damn!

We were reading in our AARP Magazine a fabulous article about Gone With The Wind.   This incredible movie from 1939 still holds the title of the best movie ever made!  We salute Gone With The Wind on 75 years of amazing and unparalleled entertainment!
Here’s another great article from the LA Times by Susan King that we thought we’d share with you about this iconic American movie:
Audiences still frankly give a damn about the lavish Civil War epic “Gone With the Wind” 75 years after its release.When adjusted for inflation, the Oscar-winning romance remains the domestic box-office champ with a gross of $1.6 billion. The 220-minute Technicolor film received a record 13 Oscar nominations, winning eight competitive Academy Awards, including best film, actress (Vivien Leigh), supporting actress (Hattie McDaniel) and director (Victor Fleming). With a production cost estimated between $3.85 million and more than $4 million, it was the longest and most expensive Hollywood sound film of the time.More than 30 million copies of Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, on which the film was based, have been sold. The film has been re-released eight times, been a staple on television since the 1970s and a bestseller on video, DVD and now Blu-ray.

Celebrations of the film’s diamond anniversary include an exhaustive exhibit at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin, a new collector’s edition Blu-Ray and several books including Life’s “Gone With the Wind: The Great American Movie 75 Years Later.”

Despite criticism and controversy over the film’s racial stereotypes — the slaves in the film are happy, and McDaniel’s Mammy is a welcome member of the family and loyal servant — “Gone With the Wind” continues to have a special, if troubling, place in the hearts of American filmgoers.

“The film was and I think continues to be a pop cultural phenomenon,” said Richard Jewell, professor at USC’s School of Cinematic Art. “It’s one of the few movies that lived up to the book.”

Long before social media, the buzz surrounding the film version of “GWTW” was astonishing. After independent producer David O. Selznick brought the rights to the book, “GWTW” fans waited on every story coming out of Hollywood about the production, particularly about who would play the willful and beautiful Scarlett O’Hara, the belle of the Tara plantation.

Though such stars as Joan Crawford, Carole Lombard and Katharine Hepburn were among those considered to play Scarlett — about 1,400 actresses were interviewed — Selznick chose British actress Vivien Leigh, who had made a few films, to play the lead role.

Fan favorite Clark Gable was selected to play Rhett Butler, the rakish Charlestonian who pursues her, and British actor Leslie Howard was cast as Scarlett’s obsession, the glum Ashley Wilkes. Olivia de Havilland, best known for ingenue roles opposite Errol Flynn, landed the plum role as Wilkes’ sweet cousin and wife, Melanie, and McDaniel was chosen to play the O’Haras’ beloved and opinionated Mammy.

Jewell noted the film was brilliantly cast. “Clark Gable was absolutely the right person to play Rhett Butler. Every actress in Hollywood wanted to play Scarlett. The fact that they went with a relatively unknown and she turned out to be the incarnation of Scarlett. It’s like a baseball team when one day every one gets a hit.

“It’s a testament to the old studio system where producers were the most important factor in most cases. Selznick kept that film together. It was Selznick’s vision more than Victor Fleming’s. To me he is one of the greatest producers of all time.”

But as Missy Schwartz, editor of the Life “GWTW” book and a senior editor at Entertainment Weekly, pointed out, “you can’t watch it without 21st century eyes. You have to address race. It’s problematic, there is no question. It is just not the reality [of slavery].”

The conversation about “GWTW’s” treatment of slavery, race and a benign antebellum South was particularly heated over the last year with the release of 2013 best picture Oscar winner “12 Years a Slave,” which depicted the brutality of slavery.

Todd Boyd, professor of critical studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, told The Times this year that “the entirety of the history of African Americans in Hollywood has been problematic, and I think in some ways still is. A lot of people looked at those movies as sort of an authentic representation of what African Americans were like.”

Jim Crow laws were in full force in the South 75 years ago. McDaniel and the other black cast members couldn’t attend the premiere in Atlanta on Dec. 15, 1939. Gable had threatened to boycott the premiere but was persuaded by McDaniel to attend. The Life book reveals that during production, Gable had also protested when he learned there were segregated toilets on one of the sets, promising not to return if they were still there the next day. They weren’t.

African Americans protested the film when it opened in major cities. Black playwright Carlton Moss stated in the Daily Worker found Mammy’s love for the white family “that has helped to keep her people enchained forever” particularly reprehensible.

Jewell noted that a lot of films from the Golden Age of Hollywood make one “uncomfortable” because of depictions of race and other issues. “But they need to be screened and talked about, as a way to measure the kind of attitudes that existed at that point, which was 75 years after the end of the Civil War. These kind of stereotypical depictions of black people need to be put in a historical context so people will have a better appreciation of how far we have come.”

TCM host and film historian Robert Osborne believes “GWTW” has endured because of its emotional resonance.

“It’s about survival,” he said. “It hit the world in the ’30s when Europe was going to war and just before we went into the war. Also, everybody has had somebody in their life that they loved more than they loved them back.

“I think the brilliant thing about the story is that there are little samplings of every part of us in it. It doesn’t matter if it was set during the Civil War. It’s a relevant movie about emotions.”

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Unknown

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Holiday Shopping Made Easy!

I’m not sure about you, but we just can’t believe that Christmas is right around the corner! And with every passing moment, the season gets busier and busier.

If you’re finding yourself running low on time and energy to face all the shopping crowds, let Amazon do all the work for you! And if you’re looking for unique gifts for the theatre lover in your life (and even better if it’s you!), check out our Amazon store!

http://astore.amazon.com/thethegui0b-20

The greatest Christmas present we think is the Gene Kelly movie 4 pack—four great Gene Kelly movies—On The Town/For Me & My Gal/Summer Stock/Invitation to The Dance—and it’s currently on sale for $11.39!!

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Happy holidays from our house to yours!

Philip & Marilyn

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Family Movie Time

Looking for something fun to watch over the holidays that isn’t a holiday movie?  We’d like to suggest On The Town.  As you know from a prior article, On The Town, it is currently playing on Broadway.  But if you can’t make it, you can always get it on Amazon, starring Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra!  We found you both the single DVD—or Amazon offers a Gene Kelly/Frank Sinatra Collection of On The Town, Anchors Away, and Take Me out to the Ballgame.

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We strongly recommend getting the collection because Gene Kelly is quite simply one of the greatest dancers we’ve ever seen!

Great classics to add to your collection!

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